Search Site
Open Navigation Menu

Menu

EmailRules Community


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font


Subject:

Re: Putting Email to the Test

From:

Jim Becker <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

EmailRules Community <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 27 Sep 2007 18:02:50 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (53 lines)

The practices that make any web page resilient (usable in a wide 
variety of browser types and browser configurations) are even more 
important for HTML e-mail than for ordinary web pages.

The main reasons for this are:

- Web-based e-mail interfaces often modify your HTML e-mail before 
displaying it to the recipient. (Basically, this is an automated merge of 
two web documents: your message and the web page that displays 
it.) Images might be removed or initially disabled, style info might be 
removed or modified, scripting might be removed or modified, and 
some HTML tags might be removed or modified.

- Some people download their e-mail then disconnect from the 
Internet, which means your e-mail has to "work" even if there's no 
current Internet connection.

- Security-conscious sites or individuals might automatically remove or 
disable images, scripts, or anything else they consider untrustworthy.

To test your e-mail for HTML resilience:

- Write correct HTML, and use a validator to check it (for example, 
http://validator.w3.org/). When your message is modified for display 
by a web-based e-mail interface, writing correct HTML increases the 
chance that your message will be handled well.

- If you use CSS (style sheet),  validate that too 
(http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/).

- Set up addresses in a variety of e-mail environments (Hotmail, Yahoo, 
Gmail, multiple versions of Outlook, etc.), then send your test message 
to each. For one newsletter I tested on 6 different e-mail 
environments, no two recipients saw exactly the same thing.

- Send a test message to your most security-conscious, privacy-
conscious, spam-hating colleague to see how the message looks in a 
restrictive e-mail environment.

- Using the security and privacy features of your browser or e-mail 
client, try viewing your message with images and scripting disabled.

- Estimate the "shelf life" of the message among your recipients (2 
months? 12 months? 5 years?), then review your HTML e-mail's 
external references (links to other sites, images, style sheets). Are all 
those external items likely to be around for the life of your e-mail? If 
not, is there a more stable item you could link to instead?

************************************************************
EmailRules - Discussion community for email communicators

Join, leave, post and read the archives at:
http://community.emailogy.com/archives/emailrules.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink


ATOM RSS1 RSS2